Let’s connect people, not hand­cuff them.
“Let’s connect people, not hand­cuff them” is a col­lec­tive art­work that converts zip ties, some­times used as hand­cuffs, into a soli­da­ri­ty chain for exi­led, undo­cu­men­ted, ille­gal immi­grants.
It sym­bo­lizes the neces­si­ty of lin­king citi­zens and poli­ti­cians in our coun­try and other coun­tries to ensure a digni­fied wel­come of immi­grants and weave them into the fabric of our com­mu­ni­ty in a mea­ning­ful and endu­ring way.

A giant soli­da­ri­ty net.
Since April 2023, artiste Béné­dicte Moyer­soen, has been tra­ve­ling the coun­try, ins­pi­ring and coor­di­na­ting hos­pi­table people of Bel­gium from ages 5 to 96, to work toge­ther to create a sym­bo­lic trans­for­ma­tion through col­la­bo­ra­tive art.
During cultu­ral events and mee­tings with the repre­sen­ta­tives of the Bel­gian com­mu­ni­ties, small groups of citi­zens in schools, busi­nesses and care homes wea­ved zip ties toge­ther, crea­ting small parts of the art­work that would later be assem­bled.
Wea­ving zip ties toge­ther is expe­ri­men­ting soli­da­ri­ty. It is mee­ting others, sha­ring ideas, and thin­king of concrete actions that can be taken for a digni­fied and durable inclu­sion.

A sym­bo­lic art­work in a public space.
The art­work consists of 112.000 zip ties that represent the num­ber of people without legal papers living in Bel­gium. When assem­bled, they look like a giant net han­ging in our public spaces. Here is where the work points out the power of bon­ding and becomes a sym­bol of the deter­mi­na­tion of many to wel­come with open arms.
The ins­tal­la­tion of this giant net was deve­lo­ped and exe­cu­ted with the help of the artist Alain De Clerck. It was only pos­sible thanks to a col­la­bo­ra­tive effort of hun­dreds of people who mobi­li­zed to create, ins­tall and cele­brate it.
The work is made of plas­tic, recy­clable zip ties. Its aim is to be a durable expo­si­tion tra­vel­ling throu­ghout Bel­gium and elsew­here, to car­ry an eter­nal, sym­bo­lic mes­sage acces­sible to eve­ry­bo­dy, wha­te­ver their age, his­to­ry and ori­gin. A dif­ferent immi­gra­tion poli­cy is pos­sible: A digni­fied, endu­ring, inclu­sive wel­come.
You can find the work­shop pho­tos, lists of our part­ners and claims on https://benedictemoyersoenoeuvrescollectivessolidaires.be

Let’s connect people, not hand­cuff them.
“Let’s connect people, not hand­cuff them” is a col­lec­tive art­work that converts zip ties, some­times used as hand­cuffs, into a soli­da­ri­ty chain for exi­led, undo­cu­men­ted, ille­gal immi­grants.
It sym­bo­lizes the neces­si­ty of lin­king citi­zens and poli­ti­cians in our coun­try and other coun­tries to ensure a digni­fied wel­come of immi­grants and weave them into the fabric of our com­mu­ni­ty in a mea­ning­ful and endu­ring way.

A giant soli­da­ri­ty net.
Since April 2023, artiste Béné­dicte Moyer­soen, has been tra­ve­ling the coun­try, ins­pi­ring and coor­di­na­ting hos­pi­table people of Bel­gium from ages 5 to 96, to work toge­ther to create a sym­bo­lic trans­for­ma­tion through col­la­bo­ra­tive art.
During cultu­ral events and mee­tings with the repre­sen­ta­tives of the Bel­gian com­mu­ni­ties, small groups of citi­zens in schools, busi­nesses and care homes wea­ved zip ties toge­ther, crea­ting small parts of the art­work that would later be assem­bled.
Wea­ving zip ties toge­ther is expe­ri­men­ting soli­da­ri­ty. It is mee­ting others, sha­ring ideas, and thin­king of concrete actions that can be taken for a digni­fied and durable inclu­sion.

A sym­bo­lic art­work in a public space.
The art­work consists of 112.000 zip ties that represent the num­ber of people without legal papers living in Bel­gium. When assem­bled, they look like a giant net han­ging in our public spaces. Here is where the work points out the power of bon­ding and becomes a sym­bol of the deter­mi­na­tion of many to wel­come with open arms.
The ins­tal­la­tion of this giant net was deve­lo­ped and exe­cu­ted with the help of the artist Alain De Clerck. It was only pos­sible thanks to a col­la­bo­ra­tive effort of hun­dreds of people who mobi­li­zed to create, ins­tall and cele­brate it.
The work is made of plas­tic, recy­clable zip ties. Its aim is to be a durable expo­si­tion tra­vel­ling throu­ghout Bel­gium and elsew­here, to car­ry an eter­nal, sym­bo­lic mes­sage acces­sible to eve­ry­bo­dy, wha­te­ver their age, his­to­ry and ori­gin. A dif­ferent immi­gra­tion poli­cy is pos­sible: A digni­fied, endu­ring, inclu­sive wel­come.
You can find the work­shop pho­tos, lists of our part­ners and claims on https://benedictemoyersoenoeuvres
collectivessolidaires.be